Shopify Themes – ProUpgrade Platform

Speech Recognition? What function is this, can this be added to the store?

As a result of a predicted boost as well as the development of 2020’s impact on business, the ecommerce market is multiplying. Everyday, even more merchants are making the move to on-line marketing, while business owners are getting their start via ecommerce ventures.
By 2022, e-retail earnings will expand to $6.54 trillion, up from $3.53 trillion in 2019.
Nevertheless, ecommerce is an ever-changing industry. Yearly, numerous brand-new trends show up that can help your service expand as well as surpass your rivals– 2021 is no various.
Keeping up with development trends can make your shop always be liked by customers, so you should never miss these e-commerce development trends.Let’s look at the top 8 ecommerce fads to watch out for in 2021.

1. Voice Business Will Surge.

Individuals are progressively relying upon voice assistant devices like the Amazon.com Mirror with Alexa and the Google Home with Google Aide to do every little thing, from waking them to getting items online. 75% of U.S. houses will have clever speakers by 2025. Voice commerce sales are prepared for to reach $40 billion by 2022.
Another reason why voice commerce gets on the rise is the growing accuracy and also comfort of the innovation. Both Google and also Amazon are pressing regional languages in their virtual aide devices to help customers go shopping even more conveniently.
Consequently, it is necessary to enhance your on-line store for voice search.
Here are four ways to prepare your ecommerce website for voice queries.
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2. Omnichannel Buying Will End Up Being the New Normal.

Omnichannel selling refers to supplying consumers a smooth as well as consistent experience throughout channels as well as gadgets.
In a study by HBR (Harvard Service Testimonial), 73% of respondents stated they utilize multiple channels during their purchasing journey. This data is almost 4 years of ages.
With the boost in the adoption of mobile devices and voice aides, I can only imagine that the number of omnichannel consumers will certainly increase a lot more in 2021.
Usage analytics tools like Finteza that give thorough ecommerce analytics to identify client actions and track whatever pertaining to the cash flow. An analytics device of this type aids you assess which items remain in need, monitor your profit and loss, as well as evaluate client commitment. Finteza additionally enables you to develop records for occasions that matter one of the most to your service, such as view items, add to cart, check out progress, as well as checkout success.
These understandings enable you to provide the exact item that your consumers are searching for and also supply a seamless shopping experience.
Below are some even more ways for you to use a seamless omnichannel experience.

3. AI and AR Will Enhance the Ecommerce Experience.

Online sellers will certainly invest $ 7.3 billion on AI by 2022. More than 120,000 shops will certainly be utilizing AR modern technologies to use clients an abundant acquiring experience by 2022.
Expert system (AI) serves as your on-line in-store affiliate by providing customized guidance and recommendations to your clients. AI uses consumers’ past acquisition history and also searching behavior to show them items they are most likely to buy.
Unlike in physical stores, online buyers can not try out or physically inspect the item that they mean to purchase. Augmented truth (AR) assists remove this obstacle by allowing customers see exactly how a particular product would certainly look on them also prior to they purchase the item.
By executing AI and AR in your ecommerce shop, you will likely see a rise in conversions and also a decline in the return price.

4. New Payment Choices Will Certainly Emerge.

Payment alternatives are among the major reasons that clients choose a particular brand. If you don’t offer your customers’ preferred repayment approach, they will not purchase from your ecommerce shop.
As of now, most ecommerce services approve electronic purses (like Google Pay, Samsung or Apple Pay, and also PayPal) besides debit as well as charge card. Cryptocurrencies, particularly Bitcoin, have several advantages for online store proprietors, such as low deal costs and no reverse purchases.
For example, Overstock partnered with Coinbase, a Bitcoin platform, to permit customers to use Bitcoin as a repayment technique.
In 2021, we could see more ecommerce companies will begin approving cryptocurrencies for deals.
see more at antdiy.vip
submitted by CommercialFlow9 to u/CommercialFlow9 [link] [comments]

06-15 10:04 - 'i have 39+ guru ecom/dropshipping and business courses worth thousands, if anyone wants any for cheap let me know.' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Mudslinger2 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 0-9min

'''
Can do a good offer if you want all of them too.
List of courses:
Kevin Zhang - Ecommerce Millionaire Mastery
Pejman Ghadimi - Watch Conspiracy
Adrian Morrison - eCom Success Academy 2018
Franklin Hatchett - Ecom Masters
Nicola Delic – Forex Master Levels
eCom Beast 2.0
Tai Lopez - Become a high paid consultant
Paul J - Amazon Dropshipping Titans - Google Drive
Real Estate Rainmaker Course
Buy it, Rent it, Profit
eCom.Turbo.2.8.zip - Google Drive
Earnest Epps - High Ticket eCom Secrets
Mentor Box
Chanel Stevens - CPA Academy
Franklin Hatchett - Savage Affiliates
Perry Marshall - Google Ads Mastery 2019-2020
Gabriel St-Germain - Ecom-Blueprint 2.0
Tim Burd - London Mastermind 2018 Replay
T. Harv Eker - Secrets Of The MultiMillionaire Trainer
David Vlas – Youtube Compilation Machine
Ruan Marinho - Underground SEO Secrets
Matt Smith - Snapvertising
Grant Cardone, BIG PACKAGE
Hayden Bowles - Hacking Shopify Dropshipping
Jason Stone - Insta Pro Academy
Justin Cener - T-Shirt Bootcamp 3.0
Super Affiliate System - John Crestani
Shopify Theme - Shoptimized 5.0.3
The Royal Blueprint - Google Drive
Shopify Theme - Slingly Themes 1.0 (eCom Full Automation)
Shopify Theme - Shopify Booster 2.2.1
Mindvalley Quest All Access Pass Membership
Richard Telfeja - Ecom Profit Masterclass
Shopify Theme - Aspire (Multipurpose Responsive Shopify Theme & Template)
Tai Lopez - Travelling CEO Program
Ezra Firestone - Smart Social
Brian Pfeiffer - FABS Coaching
Ramit Sethi - Mental Mastery
'''
i have 39+ guru ecom/dropshipping and business courses worth thousands, if anyone wants any for cheap let me know.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Mudslinger2
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

How to choose a Bitcoin payment gateway and start accepting BTC at your store?

How to choose a Bitcoin payment gateway and start accepting BTC at your store?
Nowadays cryptocurrencies become more and more popular among retail and service companies all over the world. But so far there has not been a high-quality tool that would help you to choose right payment gateway with all necessary functions that you would like to implement into your business.
So, Cryptwerk.com comes to help you!
Our catalogue lists more than 70+ different companies with crypto processing service. Use this link to enter the gateway directory:
https://cryptwerk.com/companies/payment-gateway/
How yo choose a crypto payment gateway for your business?
1. Cryptocurrencies
You must first decide what cryptocurrencies you want to accept.
Use our filters to select those gateways that provide their service with the coins of your choice.
Cryptwerk currently lists 22 most popular cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin.

https://preview.redd.it/a159bm5ok2f41.png?width=270&format=png&auto=webp&s=d5fc9aa14ace542caee769247562384cf2a039d0
You can choose one or several coins, and our website will show you a list of gateways according to your request.
2. Interface
Modern gateways provide various types of services focused on various types of business
Wallet (web or application), ready-made plugins for CMS, various widgets & buttons, POS terminals for offline retailers, sending invoices by email or sms, donation functions.
https://preview.redd.it/pi1xmzvrk2f41.png?width=254&format=png&auto=webp&s=c77f6574391315163d86e76b6866a9e4ba94b630
3. CMS plugins
This option is very useful for people who are using a Content Management System in their work with the website.
With our filters you can find a gateway with the ready-made solution for your CMS.
Thus, the installation will be very quick and easy!
https://preview.redd.it/yrj4pxstk2f41.png?width=265&format=png&auto=webp&s=5a41944920efde92e906f03f464fc95e2dcaad70
Just look at the CMS list supported by cryptographic gateways:
aMember Pro, AppThemes, Arassta, bbPress, BIGcommerce, Blesta, BOX billing, CB paid, Checkfront, CS.cart, DJ-Classifieds, Drupal Commerce, Easydigitaldownloads, ECWID, Event espresso, EventBooking, GIVE donations, HikaSHop, HostCMS, HTML5, Imagine, J2 store, Jigoshop, Joomla, LOADED commerce, Magento, ocStore, Opencart, OScommerce, NATS4, NCR, nopCommerce, PaidMembershipsPro, Payplans, phpMySQL, Planyo, Poster, PrestaShop, RedShop, R_keeper, Shop-Script, Shopify, Shopware, SpreeCommerce, SPY, Sylius, TheCartPress, Thirty Bees, Tomato Cart, Typo3 Multishop, VirtueMart, UberCart, uCommerce, Unique free, Waimea business, WCmarketplace, WHMOS, WooCommerce, Wordpress, WP eCommerce, Wpmudev, XCART, ZENcart, 1С.
4. Lightning network
Some gateways already use network lightning technology. Here you can filter out the companies that provide this service with Bitcoin and Litecoin.
https://preview.redd.it/bv02jdmyk2f41.png?width=264&format=png&auto=webp&s=6fc119562592f6bcf74d04a23681d109229b7098
Using our catalogue and filters you can choose the exact payment gateway that will meet the needs of your business.
Also, here you can see the rating of payment gateways according to our data. The rating depends on gateway popularity among merchants registered on Cryptwerk.com
https://preview.redd.it/scb70wr1l2f41.png?width=579&format=png&auto=webp&s=54e8a9d554955b7739d5e16be2056cd0df2d6f9e
We can mark first 5 companies that are most popular among our merchants.
You can safely use any of these gateways, each of which provides quality service proven by thousands of merchants.
We hope this article will be useful to all merchants who are thinking of starting to accept Bitcoin, and other popular cryptocurrencies.
submitted by Cryptwerk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

03-20 21:55 - 'Certified Shopify Expert Will Build a Shopify Store for You With Your Products or Help You Research and Source Products to Sell for Bitcoin.' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/MsRolliePollie removed from /r/Bitcoin within 27-37min

'''
I am certified as a Shopify Expert and E-Commerce Specialist nearing completion of my Developer training. I have the skills and experience to offer this low costp introductory store building offer to a few people.
I have the following advanced certifications:
*Shopify Store Operation Fundementals
*E-Commerce Product Fundamentals *E-Commerce Revenue & Pricing Fundamentals
*E-Commerce Design Principles & Techniques
*Designing For Conversions: Design Psychology
*ShopifyTheme and App Development Certifications in Progress
I am nearing the end of my training to become a listed Shopify Expert & E-Commerce Specialist. I would like to build a few more stores to have in my portfolio upon applying for jobs and freelance opportunities. From start to finish, turnaround times are around one week or sooner.
For $100 you get my knowledge and strategy to develop a marketable store with your own products or I can help you source products that can be fulfilled on demand without holding inventory. My offer includes the following:
-Shopify Store Theme Customization and Search Engine Optimization
-Custom Email Address
-Sales Channel Integration(Amazon, EBay, Etc), Cross Listing and App Configuration.
-Page Content (Up to five pages)
-Facebook and Instagram Account Set up, Three Initial Posts and Store Integration
Please message me if you want to start a Shopify store. I am also happy to help existing store owners with any services your seeking out. I can perform product research and testing, ad campaign management, social media integration and management just to list a few items.
I am ready to start some work ASAP. Please take a moment to check out some if my work through the links below.
Cheers!
[link]1 [link]2
'''
Certified Shopify Expert Will Build a Shopify Store for You With Your Products or Help You Research and Source Products to Sell for Bitcoin.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: MsRolliePollie
1: www.sugarandcotton.com 2: www.unifclothing.com
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

MKR Holder DAI-gest: Week 7, 2020

MKR Holder DAI-gest: Week 7, 2020

Governance Recap Week Ending February 15, 2020

At-A-Glance:

DAI Digits (Statistics)

We're DAI-ing to Meet You: Explore MakerDAO

At first glance, DAI and MakerDAO are a lot of acronyms and lingo that can be slightly intimidating. Anyone can become informed and participate. Dive in as much or as little as you want. Learn to buy, save, or beyond. The secret to knowing DAI (or faking it until finding an answer) is found in the Awesome MakerDAO Community Resource Guide.
Still have questions? Want to get involved? Visit the MakerDAO Community Forum and ask. The community is made of interested people like yourself, and Community Leaders from MakerDAO. Share your skills in growing the MakerDAO Community, no experience necessary. The MakerDAO culture is very warm, welcoming, and ready to help. We would love to meet you!

Governance News

Polls

The following polls ran from February 10 - 13, 2020 with voting results identical to the current set values, therefore they were not part of the Executive Vote this week. Follow the link for more details:

Recent and Current Executive Votes

Executive Vote: Activate the Sai Debt Ceiling Adjustment and Suspend Monetary Policy Votes for Technical Fixes

Current Ruling Executive: Voting Open

Executive Vote: Activated the Savings Rate Spread and the Sai and DAI Stability Fee Adjustments

Executed on February 4, 2020

Weekly Governance and Risk Meeting, Ep. 73 February 13, 2020

You are invited to join us and help shape the future of MakerDAO. Every Thursday, 17:00 UTC
Governance and Risk Meeting Community Guide * Understand the issues that are discussed and governance themes that get explored to build a healthy, secure, Maker Platform. * Get info on how to connect by phone or webcam. * Explore meeting archives.

DAI News and Info

MakerDAO is one of the newcomers to be listed on the prestigious Forbes Fintech 50 list.

Upcoming Events

How to Purchase DAI with Cash in the U.S. (No Bank Account, Credit Card, or Debit Card Required)

Maybe you have visited the coinstar machine in the grocery store when cashing in your stockpiles of change, or just seen them when checking out. These kiosks now offer the ability to buy Bitcoin with cash. You can easily turn that into DAI and lock in an amazing savings rate on the Oasis DeFi platform by MakerDAO.
submitted by adrianhacker to MakerDAO [link] [comments]

70+ crypto gateways for your store/business. How to choose and start accepting cryptocurrencies?

70+ crypto gateways for your store/business. How to choose and start accepting cryptocurrencies?
Nowadays cryptocurrencies become more and more popular among retail and service companies all over the world. By our statistics we observe monthly growth of stores, markets, services, websites accepting cryptocurrencies as a payment.
But so far there has not been a high-quality tool that would help you to choose right payment gateway with all necessary functions that you would like to implement into your business.
So, Cryptwerk.com comes to help you!
Our catalogue lists more than 70+ different companies with crypto processing service.
Use this link to enter the gateway directory.
https://cryptwerk.com/companies/payment-gateway/
1. Cryptocurrencies
You must first decide what cryptocurrencies you want to accept.
Use our filters to select those gateways that provide their service with the coins of your choice.
Cryptwerk currently lists 22 most popular cryptocurrencies:
Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash, Dash, Dogecoin, XRP, Monero, Ethereum Classic, Zcash, Tron, Digibyte, EOS, Qtum, Bitcoin Gold, NEO, Binance Coin, Decred, Verge, Groestlcoin, Bytecoin, Komodo.

https://preview.redd.it/eh44eqye8ze41.png?width=273&format=png&auto=webp&s=84f46f4405daba9923967e6977653ebaca21ac70
You can choose one or several coins, and our website will show you a list of gateways according to your request.
2. Interface
Modern gateways provide various types of services focused on various types of business
Wallet (web or application), ready-made plugins for CMS, various widgets & buttons, POS terminals for offline retailers, sending invoices by email or sms, donation functions.
https://preview.redd.it/0bxttzmg8ze41.png?width=254&format=png&auto=webp&s=239cd34d872377c2ff19edaaf79a74572e8f94fc
3. CMS plugins
This option is very useful for people who are using a Content Management System in their work with the website.
With our filters you can find a gateway with the ready-made solution for your CMS.
Thus, the installation will be very quick and easy!
Just look at the CMS list supported by cryptographic gateways:
aMember Pro, AppThemes, Arassta, bbPress, BIGcommerce, Blesta, BOX billing, CB paid, Checkfront, CS.cart, DJ-Classifieds, Drupal Commerce, Easydigitaldownloads, ECWID, Event espresso, EventBooking, GIVE donations, HikaSHop, HostCMS, HTML5, Imagine, J2 store, Jigoshop, Joomla, LOADED commerce, Magento, ocStore, Opencart, OScommerce, NATS4, NCR, nopCommerce, PaidMembershipsPro, Payplans, phpMySQL, Planyo, Poster, PrestaShop, RedShop, R_keeper, Shop-Script, Shopify, Shopware, SpreeCommerce, SPY, Sylius, TheCartPress, Thirty Bees, Tomato Cart, Typo3 Multishop, VirtueMart, UberCart, uCommerce, Unique free, Waimea business, WCmarketplace, WHMOS, WooCommerce, Wordpress, WP eCommerce, Wpmudev, XCART, ZENcart, 1С.
https://preview.redd.it/cukjy4wk8ze41.png?width=265&format=png&auto=webp&s=e4ef8a9ee89cfd93fb2aedf8290c73bce6df9354
4. Lightning network
Some gateways already use network lightning technology. Here you can filter out the companies that provide this service with Bitcoin and Litecoin.

https://preview.redd.it/3ffrhytm8ze41.png?width=264&format=png&auto=webp&s=1891680a37fcd431bbe32204021590d687bb491e
Using our catalogue and filters you can choose the exact payment gateway that will meet the needs of your business.
Also, here you can see the rating of payment gateways according to our data. The rating depends on gateway popularity among merchants registered on Cryptwerk.com
https://preview.redd.it/yh2p2dun8ze41.png?width=579&format=png&auto=webp&s=77c41d705ebd8f52f22de7d18b491b315850db92
We can mark first 5 companies that are most popular among our merchants.
You can safely use any of these gateways, each of which provides quality service proven by thousands of merchants.
We hope this article will be useful to all merchants who are thinking of starting to accept Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and other popular cryptocurrencies.
submitted by Cryptwerk to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Want to start a dropshipping website with less than $1000, how should I allocate the money?

As the title suggests, I want to start a dropshipping website. The niche would be travel-related goods (jewelry, gear, travel themed stuff). I've already found a website doing exactly what I am doing so I know it is possible, but want to know what would be the best way to go about spending what funds I do have (broke college student).
So I already know some of the have to's:
So that leaves around another $200-$500, which I need to do marketing with. I've got a couple of items up on a trial, and I'm writing copy for them (reading cas$hvertising, but have experience writing articles) but was wondering what was the best way to get visitors?
I see three ways:

I want to differentiate from others by taking professional pictures/videos (I'm a professional photographevideographer) as well as writing little blog posts about how these products can be used, travel guides, etc. That would be my competitive advantage/unique marketing twist. Plus, accepting Bitcoin.

Thoughts? Any and all feedback is welcome. Thanks in advanced!
submitted by precrime3 to ecommerce [link] [comments]

Decred Journal — May 2018

Note: New Reddit look may not highlight links. See old look here. A copy is hosted on GitHub for better reading experience. Check it out, contains photo of the month! Also on Medium

Development

dcrd: Significant optimization in signature hash calculation, bloom filters support was removed, 2x faster startup thanks to in-memory full block index, multipeer work advancing, stronger protection against majority hashpower attacks. Additionally, code refactoring and cleanup, code and test infrastructure improvements.
In dcrd and dcrwallet developers have been experimenting with new modular dependency and versioning schemes using vgo. @orthomind is seeking feedback for his work on reproducible builds.
Decrediton: 1.2.1 bugfix release, work on SPV has started, chart additions are in progress. Further simplification of the staking process is in the pipeline (slack).
Politeia: new command line tool to interact with Politeia API, general development is ongoing. Help with testing will soon be welcome: this issue sets out a test plan, join #politeia to follow progress and participate in testing.
dcrdata: work ongoing on improved design, adding more charts and improving Insight API support.
Android: design work advancing.
Decred's own DNS seeder (dcrseeder) was released. It is written in Go and it properly supports service bit filtering, which will allow SPV nodes to find full nodes that support compact filters.
Ticket splitting service by @matheusd entered beta and demonstrated an 11-way split on mainnet. Help with testing is much appreciated, please join #ticket_splitting to participate in splits, but check this doc to learn about the risks. Reddit discussion here.
Trezor support is expected to land in their next firmware update.
Decred is now supported by Riemann, a toolbox from James Prestwich to construct transactions for many UTXO-based chains from human-readable strings.
Atomic swap with Ethereum on testnet was demonstrated at Blockspot Conference LATAM.
Two new faces were added to contributors page.
Dev activity stats for May: 238 active PRs, 195 master commits, 32,831 added and 22,280 deleted lines spread across 8 repositories. Contributions came from 4-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: rapid growth from ~4,000 TH/s at the beginning of the month to ~15,000 at the end with new all time high of 17,949. Interesting dynamic in hashrate distribution across mining pools: coinmine.pl share went down from 55% to 25% while F2Pool up from 2% to 44%. [Note: as of June 6, the hashrate continues to rise and has already passed 22,000 TH/s]
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 91.3 DCR (+0.8), stake participation is 46.9% (+0.8%) with 3.68 million DCR locked (+0.15). Min price was 85.56. On May 11 ticket price surged to 96.99, staying elevated for longer than usual after such a pump. Locked DCR peaked at 47.17%. jet_user on reddit suggested that the DCR for these tickets likely came from a miner with significant hashrate.
Nodes: there are 226 public listening and 405 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 45% on v1.2.0 (up from 24% last month), 39% on v1.1.2, 15% on v1.1.0 and 1% running outdaded versions.

ASICs

Obelisk team posted an update. Current hashrate estimate of DCR1 is 1200 GH/s at 500 W and may still change. The chips came back at 40% the speed of the simulated results, it is still unknown why. Batch 1 units may get delayed 1-2 weeks past June 30. See discussions on decred and on siacoin.
@SiaBillionaire estimated that 7940 DCR1 units were sold in Batches 1-5, while Lynmar13 shared his projections of DCR1 profitability (reddit).
A new Chinese miner for pre-order was noticed by our Telegram group. Woodpecker WB2 specs 1.5 TH/s at 1200 W, costs 15,000 CNY (~2,340 USD) and the initial 150 units are expected to ship on Aug 15. (pow8.comtranslated)
Another new miner is iBelink DSM6T: 6 TH/s at 2100 W costing $6,300 (ibelink.co). Shipping starts from June 5. Some concerns and links were posted in these two threads.

Integrations

A new mining pool is available now: altpool.net. It uses PPLNS model and takes 1% fee.
Another infrastructure addition is tokensmart.io, a newly audited stake pool with 0.8% fee. There are a total of 14 stake pools now.
Exchange integrations:
OpenBazaar released an update that allows one to trade cryptocurrencies, including DCR.
@i2Rav from i2trading is now offering two sided OTC market liquidity on DCUSD in #trading channel.
Paytomat, payments solution for point of sale and e-commerce, integrated Decred. (missed in April issue)
CoinPayments, a payment processor supporting Decred, developed an integration with @Shopify that allows connected merchants to accept cryptocurrencies in exchange for goods.

Adoption

New merchants:
An update from VotoLegal:
michae2xl: Voto Legal: CEO Thiago Rondon of Appcívico, has already been contacted by 800 politicians and negotiations have started with four pre-candidates for the presidency (slack, source tweet)
Blockfolio rolled out Signal Beta with Decred in the list. Users who own or watch a coin will automatically receive updates pushed by project teams. Nice to see this Journal made it to the screenshot!
Placeholder Ventures announced that Decred is their first public investment. Their Investment Thesis is a clear and well researched overview of Decred. Among other great points it noted the less obvious benefit of not doing an ICO:
By choosing not to pre-sell coins to speculators, the financial rewards from Decred’s growth most favor those who work for the network.
Alex Evans, a cryptoeconomics researcher who recently joined Placeholder, posted his 13-page Decred Network Analysis.

Marketing

@Dustorf published March–April survey results (pdf). It analyzes 166 responses and has lots of interesting data. Just an example:
"I own DECRED because I saw a YouTube video with DECRED Jesus and after seeing it I was sold."
May targeted advertising report released. Reach @timhebel for full version.
PiedPiperCoin hired our advisors.
More creative promos by @jackliv3r: Contributing, Stake Now, The Splitting, Forbidden Exchange, Atomic Swaps.
Reminder: Stakey has his own Twitter account where he tweets about his antics and pours scorn on the holders of expired tickets.
"Autonomy" coin sculpture is available at sigmasixdesign.com.

Events

BitConf in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Jake Yocom-Piatt presented "Decentralized Central Banking". Note the mini stakey on one of the photos. (articletranslated, photos: 1 2 album)
Wicked Crypto Meetup in Warsaw, Poland. (video, photos: 1 2)
Decred Polska Meetup in Katowice, Poland. First known Decred Cake. (photos: 1 2)
Austin Hispanic Hackers Meetup in Austin, USA.
Consensus 2018 in New York, USA. See videos in the Media section. Select photos: booth, escort, crew, moon boots, giant stakey. Many other photos and mentions were posted on Twitter. One tweet summarized Decred pretty well:
One project that stands out at #Consensus2018 is @decredproject. Not annoying. Real tech. Humble team. #BUIDL is strong with them. (@PallerJohn)
Token Summit in New York, USA. @cburniske and @jmonegro from Placeholder talked "Governance and Cryptoeconomics" and spoke highly of Decred. (twitter coverage: 1 2, video, video (from 32 min))
Campus Party in Bahia, Brazil. João Ferreira aka @girino and Gabriel @Rhama were introducing Decred, talking about governance and teaching to perform atomic swaps. (photos)
Decred was introduced to the delegates from Shanghai's Caohejing Hi-Tech Park, organized by @ybfventures.
Second Decred meetup in Hangzhou, China. (photos)
Madison Blockchain in Madison, USA. "Lots of in-depth questions. The Q&A lasted longer than the presentation!". (photo)
Blockspot Conference Latam in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (photos: 1, 2)
Upcoming events:
There is a community initiative by @vj to organize information related to events in a repository. Jump in #event_planning channel to contribute.

Media

Decred scored B (top 3) in Weiss Ratings and A- (top 8) in Darpal Rating.
Chinese institute is developing another rating system for blockchains. First round included Decred (translated). Upon release Decred ranked 26. For context, Bitcoin ranked 13.
Articles:
Audios:
Videos:

Community Discussions

Community stats: Twitter 39,118 (+742), Reddit 8,167 (+277), Slack 5,658 (+160). Difference is between May 5 and May 31.
Reddit highlights: transparent up/down voting on Politeia, combining LN and atomic swaps, minimum viable superorganism, the controversial debate on Decred contractor model (people wondered about true motives behind the thread), tx size and fees discussion, hard moderation case, impact of ASICs on price, another "Why Decred?" thread with another excellent pitch by solar, fee analysis showing how ticket price algorithm change was controversial with ~100x cut in miner profits, impact of ticket splitting on ticket price, recommendations on promoting Decred, security against double spends and custom voting policies.
@R3VoLuT1OneR posted a preview of a proposal from his company for Decred to offer scholarships for students.
dcrtrader gained a couple of new moderators, weekly automatic threads were reconfigured to monthly and empty threads were removed. Currently most trading talk happens on #trading and some leaks to decred. A separate trading sub offers some advantages: unlimited trading talk, broad range of allowed topics, free speech and transparent moderation, in addition to standard reddit threaded discussion, permanent history and search.
Forum: potential social attacks on Decred.
Slack: the #governance channel created last month has seen many intelligent conversations on topics including: finite attention of decision makers, why stakeholders can make good decisions (opposed to a common narrative than only developers are capable of making good decisions), proposal funding and contractor pre-qualification, Cardano and Dash treasuries, quadratic voting, equality of outcome vs equality of opportunity, and much more.
One particularly important issue being discussed is the growing number of posts arguing that on-chain governance and coin voting is bad. Just a few examples from Twitter: Decred is solving an imagined problem (decent response by @jm_buirski), we convince ourselves that we need governance and ticket price algo vote was not controversial, on-chain governance hurts node operators and it is too early for it, it robs node operators of their role, crypto risks being captured by the wealthy, it is a huge threat to the whole public blockchain space, coin holders should not own the blockchain.
Some responses were posted here and here on Twitter, as well as this article by Noah Pierau.

Markets

The month of May has seen Decred earn some much deserved attention in the markets. DCR started the month around 0.009 BTC and finished around 0.0125 with interim high of 0.0165 on Bittrex. In USD terms it started around $81 and finished around $92, temporarily rising to $118. During a period in which most altcoins suffered, Decred has performed well; rising from rank #45 to #30 on Coinmarketcap.
The addition of a much awaited KRW pair on Upbit saw the price briefly double on some exchanges. This pair opens up direct DCR to fiat trading in one of the largest cryptocurrency markets in the world.
An update from @i2Rav:
We have begun trading DCR in large volume daily. The interest around DCR has really started to grow in terms of OTC quote requests. More and more customers are asking about trading it.
Like in previous month, Decred scores high by "% down from ATH" indicator being #2 on onchainfx as of June 6.

Relevant External

David Vorick (@taek) published lots of insights into the world of ASIC manufacturing (reddit). Bitmain replied.
Bitmain released an ASIC for Equihash (archived), an algorithm thought to be somewhat ASIC-resistant 2 years ago.
Three pure PoW coins were attacked this month, one attempting to be ASIC resistant. This shows the importance of Decred's PoS layer that exerts control over miners and allows Decred to welcome ASIC miners for more PoW security without sacrificing sovereignty to them.
Upbit was raided over suspected fraud and put under investigation. Following news reported no illicit activity was found and suggested and raid was premature and damaged trust in local exchanges.
Circle, the new owner of Poloniex, announced a USD-backed stablecoin and Bitmain partnership. The plan is to make USDC available as a primary market on Poloniex. More details in the FAQ.
Poloniex announced lower trading fees.
Bittrex plans to offer USD trading pairs.
@sumiflow made good progress on correcting Decred market cap on several sites:
speaking of market cap, I got it corrected on coingecko, cryptocompare, and worldcoinindex onchainfx, livecoinwatch, and cryptoindex.co said they would update it about a month ago but haven't yet I messaged coinlib.io today but haven't got a response yet coinmarketcap refused to correct it until they can verify certain funds have moved from dev wallets which is most likely forever unknowable (slack)

About This Issue

Some source links point to Slack messages. Although Slack hides history older than ~5 days, you can read individual messages if you paste the message link into chat with yourself. Digging the full conversation is hard but possible. The history of all channels bridged to Matrix is saved in Matrix. Therefore it is possible to dig history in Matrix if you know the timestamp of the first message. Slack links encode the timestamp: https://decred.slack.com/archives/C5H9Z63AA/p1525528370000062 => 1525528370 => 2018-05-05 13:52:50.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Your feedback is precious. You can post on GitHub, comment on Reddit or message us in #writers_room channel.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Richard-Red, snr01 and solar.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Merchant Mondays - pay with Vtc today! New stores & Shopify plugin

Welcome back!

Show your appreciation for the businesses that lead the way in the adoption of cryptocurrencies. Instead of paying with fiat for your next purchase, use this Monday initiative to pay with VTC instead. Did you buy anything with Vertcoin recently? Please share your experience.
Vertcoin Merchant website
This past two weeks we've really started noticing more interest in accepting Vertcoin. This is undoubtedly thanks to all the interest everyone here is creating in the subject. Furthermore, it now became even more trivial to accept VTC payments online with the Shopify plugin. The stars are ligning up people :)
We have a couple of new additions since last week. Some examples are Learncrypto.io, who are set out to teach crypto trading and Astronaut Apparel, who are bringing business and Crypto together in a way that doesn't involve making your own ICO.
If a business should be added to or removed from the list, let me know!

Debit cards

Education

New

Food

Gambling

Garden & Agriculture

Gift Cards

Goods/Merchandise

New

New

Medical

New

Multimedia Services

Professional (law) Services

Printing

Technology

Video Games

Wallets & miscellaneous

(NSFW) Adult shops

submitted by thatmanontheright to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Merchant monday - Adoption

Welcome back!

Show your appreciation for the businesses that lead the way in the adoption of cryptocurrencies. Instead of paying with fiat for your next purchase, use this Monday initiative to pay with VTC instead.
Vertcoin Merchant website
It's been a slow week in terms of new merchants, but that's no cause for worry. It just shows we have to try harder! It also shows the importance of supporting our existing merchants.
I want to call attention to two merchants this week.
PexPeppers is not a new merchant, but actually they have been a supporter of Vertcoin for a long time. They are now offering a Vertcoin branded hotsauce. You can order one here. I Would like to hear your Vertcoin hotsauce puns in the comments.
We added Lazy Pyramid in to our list this week. Lazy Pyramid is a relatively new marketplace that provides all sorts of items. They distinguish themselves by going the extra mile. They even say you can mail them to request items that you can't find on the site.
Want to become a merchant? Check out the Coinpayments Shopify plugin.
If a business should be added to or removed from the list, let me know!

Debit cards

Education

Food

Gambling

Garden & Agriculture

Gift Cards

Goods/Merchandise

New

Medical

Multimedia Services

Professional (law) Services

Printing

Technology

Video Games

Wallets & miscellaneous

(NSFW) Adult shops

submitted by thatmanontheright to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Merchant Monday

Hi

This is your weekly reminder that VTC is a currency. You can buy lots of stuff, why not use Vertcoin?
Vertcoin Merchant website
 
I want to call attention to a few merchants this week.
Burrell-Law's) New York City-based attorneys provide a broad range of transactional legal services. They have a focus on small and start-up companies.
Two weeks ago I told you to buy stickers, so here's a shop to buy them! Shillshop provides stickers in outdoor quality and is "based in The Netherlands, all the products we sell are also produced in The Netherlands to make sure you'll receive the highest quality!"
Be sure to check them both of them out!  
Happy buying!
 
Want to become a merchant? Or want to help someone? Check out the Coinpayments Shopify plugin.  
If a business should be added to or removed from the list, let me know!

Debit cards

Education

Food

Gambling

Garden & Agriculture

Gift Cards

Goods/Merchandise

Medical

Multimedia Services

Professional (law) Services

Printing

Technology & Internet

Video Games

Wallets & miscellaneous

(NSFW) Adult shops

submitted by thatmanontheright to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to EntrepreneurRideAlong [link] [comments]

#889 Shopify Krypto Zahlungen, Grayscale Kunden kaufen massiv BTC & Ledger, Trezor und KeepKey Leak How To Accept Bitcoin on Shopify How To Accept Bitcoin on Shopify Shopify Bitcoin  Does Shopify Work With Bitcoin? Shopify tutorial for beginners - Bitcoin Payment Integration (EASY)

The purpose of this discussion board is to put Bitcoin on the radar for shopify so that we can accept this new form of legitimate currency. There is a company out of California called Coinbase that offers merchant services and USD to BTC (bitcoin) trades. please put your opinion and if you want to be able to accept Choose one of portal sections (Community, Knowledgebase, Marketplace) to see categories menu here. All free Shopify themes include the option to display payment icons in your footer. The icons that show are determined by your store's payment settings , and can be enabled in the theme editor . If you want to add or remove payment icons without changing your payment settings, then you can do so by editing your theme code. That is, a Bitcoin transaction takes an average of 10 minutes to be resolved – 90 minutes at the most. During that process, there are confirmations that occur that the transfer of Bitcoins is occurring. The fewer the number of confirmations requested – you can request zero – the lower the fee to send coins; there is never a fee to receive Bitcoins. But you can also request as many as 36 ... If you need to build a website related to cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum, then you have to check out these WordPress themes. These WordPress themes are designed for cryptocurrency sites, and they come with useful features like Google Fonts, WPML and WooCommerce compatibility, Bootstrap frameworks, retina ready designs, premium sliders, drag and drop page builders, parallax effects ...

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#889 Shopify Krypto Zahlungen, Grayscale Kunden kaufen massiv BTC & Ledger, Trezor und KeepKey Leak

How To Accept Bitcoin on Shopify - Duration: 10:21. Matthew Sabia 15,363 views. 10:21. ... KEEP THEM POOR! - Duration: 10:27. MotivationHub Recommended for you. 10:27. Build a Bitcoin payment site ... willkommen zur Bitcoin-Informant Show Nr. 889. Heute sprechen wir über folgende Themen: Shopify ermöglicht Krypto Zahlungen an Händler, Grayscale Kunden kaufen massiv BTC & Ledger, Trezor und ... Free Shopify Course For Beginners: https://goo.gl/BYTfH3 Quick and easy Shopify tutorial for beginners on accepting bitcoin payments. Start accepting bitcoin today and join thousands of Shopify ... Are you an online seller wondering about Bitcoin & Crypto-Currencies? In part one of this course we answer basic questions such as, 1. What is Bitcoin & Crypto-Currency? 2. Why is it gaining ... This is how you can accept Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in your Shopify store. I’ll show you how to accept payments with Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and Bitcoin Cash through your checkout ...

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